Doing The Best I Can: Empathy and Self-Compassion

Yesterday was a struggle. I resented the sunshine and just wanted to spend my one day off doing a bunch of nothing. I watched the news incessantly, binge watched a new show and finally took my mat outside to lie in the sun. Eventually B and I made up a soccer game in the living room to get moving and to entertain ourselves. Overworking is difficult. Boredom is real as well.

One of the things I have become aware of is that I am personally up and down with EVERYTHING right now. Taking a business to a brand new online model in 3 days is not what I would call “relaxing”. For me boredom has not been a thing until yesterday. Life has been nonstop problem solving, learning and teaching.

That has led me to reflect on how every person I speak with is experiencing this crisis in different ways.  Read More »

Exhale Fear

Forget safety. Live where you fear to live. Destroy your reputation. Be notorious.

~Rumi

Many years ago when I was young I was very ill and went through about 5 years of multiple surgeries and hospitalizations. It really sucked. My 20’s and early 30’s I was “sickly” and I lived with a great deal of uncertainly and fear. Meanwhile I was a young mother, quite poor at times and trying to manage multiple things. After each surgery I would withdraw inward from the pain, rarely looking at anyone, talking or moving. I had no practices during most of this time to rely upon, only my youth, stubbornness, my love for my children and refusal to accept the label SICKLY. When I would make it home from the hospital my mom would take care of me and the next day we would walk to the mailbox. The next day I would walk to the next driveway. Then the third day I could usually make it all the way down the street. After that, things would generally fall back into place and life would resume…until the illness began again.

The way of recovery was to DO something physical in order to become stronger. The way out was to BELIEVE that I could do it. The way out was to PERSEVERE despite the pain. I went through this cycle so many times until my last surgery which was about 14 years ago. I was in the step-down ICU for 5 months and left the hospital with a walker. 2 months later I went backpacking (I was 38 after all), that is how quickly I recovered partially because by then I DID have practices.  Read More »

Chanting AUMn


Luna shares insight on the meaning of the sound Ohm and how to chant AUMn

Love our videos? Watch AUMn BLOOPERS 

Walking the Line of Doing Fine

“How are you? Are you ok? How are you feeling. “

I’m not an “ok-er”. I’ve come to know this about myself. As philosophical as I am, as much as What Does It All MEAN tends to drive my life I see I am also I realist and a practical person.  

I am NOT ok. Yet of course, I am OK in that way that only someone who knows that All is Well can know. But I also know that the Susan part of me is not ok. I hope that is ok with you because I’m just into being real. If you need me to be like perfect or always ok then don’t read this. (and I’m also ok with the fact that this might not be ok with you).

Everything has changed now. And of course everything is always changing but everything has REALLY changed. And I’m angry. And I’m sad. And I’m grateful. And I’m ecstatic. And I’m afraid. And I am not afraid of anything. And I’m curious. And I just want everything to go back to how it was.

Brave people grieve. Vulnerable people grieve. All people grieve. Do you see the pattern here?

Grief is a walk on the line between acceptance and attachment, letting go of yesterday just enough to accept and live today yet never letting go of the joy of flying through the sea, the wonder of your child reaching for your hand the first time, the sweetness of love given by your partner who knew you at your core and loved you exactly as you are—all of your amazing, neurotic, wonderful, ok-ness even if you never put the toilet paper back on the holder. Read More »

A Quick Guide to the 8 Limbs of Yoga

The 8 Limbs of Yoga were written down by Patanjali over 2000 years ago in the Yoga Sutras. Previously, the yoga techniques were passed down orally from yoga guru to disciple. The Sutras (meaning ‘thread’ in sanskrit) are a collection of 196 short statements on the theory and practice of yoga.  In essence, the sutras are an outline of the teachings of yoga. Each sutra requires contemplation to unpack the depth of its meaning from its simplicity. Many commentaries have been written which attempt to illuminate the sutras and if you are interested I suggest looking to one of these commentaries for more exploration. The following is a incomplete and simplified version of the The 8 Limbs of Yoga from my humble, pragmatic perspective.

1st Limb: Yamas (Restraints)

2nd Limb: Niyamas (Observances)

The Yamas and Niyamas, the ethical precepts for Yoga, are the foundation for all of the other yogic practices. Rather than view them as a way to judge right from wrong, they can be used for guidance on how to live a yogic life, where we consider which actions will support love and connection.

3rd Limb: Asana (Postures)

The 3rd Limb is the what most people identify with yoga, the physical postures. The postures help ground us into the experiences of our body, anchor us to the present moment and revitalize the flow of energy, relieving stagnate or constricted energy in the body.

Read More »